Training

Raise Shoulder Awareness With This Simple Move

Keeping your shoulders back and down is not only the best way to improve your posture, doing so keeps your body and shoulders in a structurally sound position to move big weight in movements like bent rows, bench presses and overhead presses. The simple drill above will help teach you greater awareness of your shoulder position and what it feels like when you’re locked in.

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Pallof Press — The Best Exercises Named After Famous Lifters

For great abs and obliques, skip the machines and crunches and do the Pallof press. It’s safe, effective, and very tough.

Want to target the entire core, including the shoulder and hip complexes in addition to the abdominal wall? Give the Pallof press a shot. This anti-rotation movement will challenge your static and dynamic stability of the “pillar” all at once.

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Are Pain Killers Killing Your Gains? The Truth About NSAIDs and Body Building

Heavy weightlifting, like most any sport, can cause pain and soreness. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen are what most people turn to first and for many these drugs are part of a daily routine. When it comes to NSAIDs and bodybuilding/weight lifting the debate over whether they hurt muscle and strength gains is ongoing and often filled with misinformation and bro-science. So do NSAIDs negatively affect protein metabolism?

NSAIDs are taken regularly by approximately 33 million Americans and over 30 billion doses of NSAIDs are consumed annually in the United States making them the most used medications on the market. The major side effects of NSAIDs are related to their effects on the stomach and bowels and this is where much of the misinformation stems from.

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Deloading 101: Your Body Needs Rest to Grow, Here’s How to Give it Some

You cannot train hard every week forever, your body simply cannot take it. You’ll end up fatigued, sore and prone to injury. When you train hard for a long duration of time, you eventually have to take one step back in order to take two steps forward. Training absolutely must be planned around periodic deload or recovery weeks in order to allow the joints, tendons, muscles, and mind to regenerate and come back stronger than before.

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